INTRODUCTION


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

A Sustainable Response to the Housing Needs of Booming North Dakota Cities & Towns

The Timeless Village™ project is a way of addressing housing needs in booming cities and towns in the North Dakota Region. Rather than presenting a site plan for a specific location, this project establishes a system - a pattern language - that can be used in producing solutions for different sites. In other words, rather than addressing the specificities of a particular context, this project provides general tools that can be used to generate smart decisions for a wide variety of design related issues, such as creating a vibrant community through a well-managed phasing scheme and addressing the needs of different users and residents.
INTRODUCTION
TIMELESS VILLAGE

MODEL SITE PLAN


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

When creating a Timeless Village, there are five universal planning and design principles to follow. These principles can be summarized as: walkability, compactness, diversity, a strong public realm, and opportunities for food growing.  The plan presented here depicts the mature phase of the Timeless Village after most of the need to accommodate short-term workers disappears and is replaced by family homes. The residential portion of the plan, which includes the central park, covers 10.8 acres gross (including streets and alleys). There are 8.7 acres of highway-oriented supporting facilities, such as a hotel, service center and restaurant. This plan is the essential nucleus of the Timeless Village, which has the necessary components for future growth.

The Schematic Village Plan is produced not for a particular context, but is meant to be a general guideline for the Timeless Village in a variety of contexts. The imaginary location is a highway crossing that is typical of the fringes of many small towns in the North Dakota region. In many cases, these kinds of intersections accommodate car-oriented amenities such as gas stations, service centers, hotels and fast food franchises. While these facilities are useful and necessary, they do not typically provide a neighborly environment.

The Schematic Village Plan proposes a transition from the car-oriented facilities along the highways to the neighborhood core by means of a streetscape that changes progressively from car-oriented to pedestrian-oriented in character. A central park with generous open space, a community center, a greenhouse, community gardens, and an outdoor event center creates a strong sense of arrival. The plan also accommodates a hotel and a service center, which will be especially necessary in the early stages of development. A strong network of streets, alleys and sidewalks provides connectivity.
MODEL SITE PLAN
TIMELESS VILLAGE

SITE PLAN PHASES


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

The purpose of the phasing plans is to explore the potential for different facilities to support each other throughout different phases of development. These plans depict one possible scenario. The exact phasing scenario will depend on the demand and particular properties of each context. The development of the village is presented in four phases. However, actual development may not be as clearly defined. Transitions between phases will take time, and the development plan may require adjustment to fit the needs of the growing community. The plans presented here are intended to inspire and inform smart decisions about growth.

PHASE 1: Provides 144 compact bedrooms in six 24-bedroom buildings to accommodate the initial housing need for workers.  (Note: This does not include the hotel.)

PHASE 2: 215 beds added:
3 duplex buildings (each with 15 bedrooms and up to 21 beds)
2 four-unit row house buildings (each with 39 bedrooms and up to 42 beds)
1 six-unit row house building (64 bedrooms and up to 68 beds)

PHASE 3: 150 beds added:
2 duplex buildings (each with 15 bedrooms and up to 21 beds)
9 cottages (each with 7 bedrooms and up to 12 beds)
SITE PLAN PHASES
TIMELESS VILLAGE

SMALL COTTAGES


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

There will be a number of cottage plans that can respond to different family sizes and configurations. The floor plan shown here is one example of a small cottage whose flexible design allows it to change to meet different housing needs as the community develops. The initial shell of the building and the majority of the plumbing remains in place throughout the phases of development. Through the addition and removal of a few partition walls, the house can serve as a comfortable dormitory for workers (with 7 compact bedrooms and up to 12 beds), as an office space, or as a single-family home (with 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms). The ground level floor area is 660 s.f. and upper level floor area is 608 s.f. totaling 1,268 s.f.

The form of the building is simple, making construction fast and economical. The facade can vary, as shown below, to add interest and character to the streetscape. The ample front porch engages life on the street and allows life in the house to spill out into the community, whether the residents are short-term workers or long-term families.
SMALL COTTAGES
TIMELESS VILLAGE

DUPLEX


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

The plan presented here is an example of a duplex building that addresses a street corner. Its scale and articulation are similar to a single-family detached house, but it brings two units together.  For the Workforce House phase, the two units are combined through openings in the demising walls and only one of the staircases is constructed. As a Workforce House, the duplex has 15 compact bedrooms (up to 21 beds) and 4 bathrooms. In the final family housing phase, the demising wall between the units is filled in and fire-rated, the staircase of the second unit is constructed, and the two units function independently.
DUPLEX
TIMELESS VILLAGE

ROW HOUSES


TIMELESS VILLAGE, NORTH DAKOTA

Row houses offer a more urban version of family living than the cottages and duplexes. In addition, attaching units to form row houses is a good climatic response to the cold and windy conditions in North Dakota. Presented here is an example of a four-unit row house building that successfully addresses a street corner.  As in the duplex, the row house units are connected in the Workforce House phase and only the necessary staircases are constructed (two of the final four). Connections between the units create a floor plan with a double-loaded hallway similar to a typical hotel floor plan. The bedrooms are small, but amenities such as porches and backyards create a quality living experience. In this phase, the 5,356 s.f. building accommodates 39 compact bedrooms (up to 42 beds) and 7.5 bathrooms. (The six-unit version of the row house, which has two additional interior bays, can accommodate 65 bedrooms and 11.5 bathrooms.)

In the final phase for family living, the openings connecting the row houses are eliminated and the demising walls are fire-rated. The staircases are added to the two interior row houses so that the units function independently from one another. The ground-level powder rooms and kitchens of the interior units are remodeled. The finishes are revisited to make the units ready for family living. The garages are also constructed. The interior row houses have backyards and detached garages. The corner unit has an attached garage and gains an additional bedroom in the connector between the main house and garage (see plan). This connector creates an appealing elevation on the side street

The corner unit is a 1,296 s.f., 3-bedroom, 2-bath unit. The three remaining units are 1,300 s.f., 3-bedroom, 1½ bath units.
ROW HOUSES
TIMELESS VILLAGE